Toronto - March 5, 2020

Sun Life Financial Tower (Vantage Venues)
16th Floor
150 King Street West, Toronto



Overview

The Canadian Legal Innovation Forum returns to Toronto in March, 2020 - the premier forum of the second annual, national series. The purpose of the forum is to build a legal leadership network focused on how to stay competitive in key areas relevant to Canadian business and the legal sector’s role in supporting it. It also focuses on the latest thinking in terms of innovation when it comes to practice management. Proposed panel, presentation and interview topics outlined below.

  • To provide legal practitioners with context, information and guidance on how to define and evolve their innovation strategies.

  • To encourage collaboration in the legal sector to tackle the toughest challenges it and the businesses they support are facing and leveraging opportunities.

  • To build a national network of innovators focused on invoking change in the legal sector and aligning with business trends in the Canadian Economy.


Themes

Proposed panel, presentation and interview topics for the Canadian Legal Innovation Forum (full agenda below).

The business impact of changes to privacy laws.

Finance: regulation, innovation and law.

Rethinking the shape, scope and trajectory of the legal career.

Developing an innovative law firm strategy.

In-House strategy: aligning with the business.

Defining, developing and executing an impactful legal technology strategy.

Demystifying the role of alternative legal service providers.


Agenda - March 2019

The business impact of changes to privacy laws.

Evolving changes to privacy laws are having a significant impact for local companies doing business in domestic and international markets. To date, Canadian companies - particularly those in the tech sector - have had to adjust to the EU’s GDPR rules and emerging privacy laws in states such as California. Further, far-reaching changes to privacy laws in both the US and Canada on a federal level are also anticipated. Businesses - and lawyers working in and for them - have had to adjust accordingly; sometimes with significant impact on their operating models. This panel will focus changes to national and international privacy laws and how businesses (and the lawyers supporting them) can best respond.
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Finance: regulation, innovation and law.
Since 2008, regulation of the financial sector has been a constantly evolving story. In this panel, we’ll review the impact of regulation on finance over the past decade (and both the intended and unintended consequences) as well as what’s on the horizon in terms of future regulation.

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Rethinking the shape, scope and trajectory of the legal career.

Increasingly, lawyers are seeking alternative career paths. Many are entering nascent sectors like technology in business roles - applying their legal expertise in new ways. They are seeking more flexible working arrangements as lawyers joining companies that support this. And they are looking to their traditional employers - law firms and in-house - to support non-traditional career paths. This shift presents both dilemmas and opportunities for lawyers and their traditional employers. How can law firms and in-house teams support non-traditional legal career paths in their firms, companies and outside of them? And what opportunities exist for lawyers seeking career experience beyond traditional lawyering? This panel will look at the current shape, scope and trajectory of the new legal career.

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Developing an innovative law firm strategy.

With increasing competition and client expectations, law firms need to innovate. As a core pillar of their strategy, they need to foster an innovation mindset and match it with enhanced practice and service delivery models. There are many examples of how law firms are doing this. They are employing allied, non-legal professionals in prominent roles. They are re-organising areas such as pensions, compensation and technology systems. They are partnering with third parties - often competitors - to provide solutions for their clients. And they are working to provide more flexible and fulfilling careers for their employees. This panel will look at the core components of an effective law firm innovation strategy and how to develop and deliver one.
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In-House strategy: aligning with the business.

An agreed upon thread in the in-house innovation discourse is the need to align with the business. But too often these conversations tend to remain in-house - that is - between lawyers. What does the business really need from in-house and external counsel? How can lawyers engage with business partners to understand, determine and develop flexible solutions to support business growth - moving from a cost centre to a value creator? And - conversely - what do lawyers need from their business leaders to support this? This panel - formed of senior level business people and lawyers - will discuss how they can better collaborate to deliver results.
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Defining, developing and executing an impactful legal technology strategy.

Technology is a critical component to any successful legal innovation strategy. Yet much of legal technology’s impact is over-hyped and visible results can be hard to measure. How can law firms and law departments develop a coherent, durable and cost effective technology strategy to drive their broader innovation agenda? And how can vendors work to align better with their clients’ to support their innovation agendas? Here, we will look at examples of how law and technology are converging to deliver impactful innovation.
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Demystifying the role of alternative legal service providers.

Alternative legal service providers are having a significant impact on the legal
sector. They focus on closer alignment with client objectives and re-designing how to deliver them. The remit of ALSPs is broad. They advise law departments and law firms on optimising their strategy and structures, provide tech-enabled delivery mechanisms and sell legal services. Others provide innovative financing and resourcing models. This panel will focus on how ALSPs are changing the legal landscape and the opportunities emerging from their growing importance.

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